Building Crisis Management. Capacity in the EU

Authors:

  • Hagström Frisell Eva
  • Oredsson Maria

Publish date: 2006-01-01

Report number: FOI-R--1920--SE

Pages: 64

Written in: English

Abstract

Several terrorist attacks and large-scale natural disasters have occurred in the last couple of years. These crises have resulted in EU agreements to enhance the union´s and the member states´ability to handle future crises. Two aspects of these agreements are analysed in this report. First, what crisis management capacity are the member states willing to give the EU? Secondly, what role can military resources have within the framework of EU crisis management capacity? Member states agree on the principle of national responsibility for crisis management capacity? Member states agree on the principle of national responsibility for crisis management in relation to terrorism and natural disasters. the EU is given a role in some situations, especially when it comes to actions after a disaster or a crisis that has occured outside the EU borders. Regarding the use of military resources, member states underline that civilian authorities have the main responsibility and that military support should be given as a last resort. Given these destrictions, military support after terrorist attacks and natural disasters may include resources for command and control, intelligence and transportation. A European approach to crisis management is developing. This approach includes a threat-based perspective including prevention of terrorism, as well as a capability-based perspective, focusing on comprehensive crisis management arrangements.

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